Brisbane Metro

Brisbane / QLD Transport Discussion

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tonyp
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by tonyp »

Cazza wrote: Thu Jul 16, 2020 8:23 pm They are talking about artics in this case.
Thanks, so it's artics (calling a spade a spade)!
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by ^^__^^ »

daveeyh wrote: Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:34 pm
Do you know which terminus is the problem with HCV for the Blue Glider?
Both ends present different challenges.

Teneriffe is smaller than UQ Lakes but there will be a similar (maybe slightly less lol) frequency of bus movements into that area over a given time, add in the 199 and its a very busy space. So whether the terminus moves out of that location or the 199 moves to service another spot in the area remains to be seen.
West End, similar issue. Another concern is the size of the bus stops along the route and if passengers can safely be set down etc. around the West End area.
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385BUZ
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by 385BUZ »

So I assume well see a fair few artics go E, as it seems like the perfect place to put them - large and plenty of routes that artics could service. Will certainly be instresting!
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daveeyh
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by daveeyh »

I am still very skeptical about the need for artics on the Blue Glider - before COVID, whenever I saw a full Blue Glider, the next one or two (which often would be a minute behind) would be near empty - I think TfB looked at the number of full Blue Gliders to make the decision to use artics rather than looking at the average patronage of all peak hour Blue Gliders.
The major issue with the Blue Glider, in my opinion, was keeping to timetable, not capacity.
I couldn't count the number of times I have seen no Blue Gliders for 15 minutes through the Cultural Centre in evening peak and then three or four arrive within two minutes - I remember one instance where CC Platform 2 had four Blue Gliders at the same time.
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by Vitalstatistix »

Hi all a Translink liveried bus bodied by Global Bus Ventures is on the move making its way to the ports of Auckland this morning.
im zug zum flug

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tonyp
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Re: Brisbane Metro

Post by tonyp »

Some interesting detailed information on the Hess buses for the metro from the Hungarian bus portal Magyarbusz (google translated):

https://magyarbusz.info/2021/02/20/iden ... llanybusz/
The first double-articulated Hess Lightram to Australia is expected this year
Author: Patthy Gellért
Date: February 20, 2021

If all goes according to plan, Hess will deliver a total of 60 of LighTram’s 25 fantasy double-hinge models to Brisbane on Australia’s east coast. For the time being, the Swiss bus manufacturer has presented an export to the third most populous city in the land of kangaroos in an animation created jointly with the local government, from which the first working prototype is planned to be made this year.

Together with the agglomeration of Brisbane, with a population of nearly 2.5 million, the largest transport development project in recent years is the construction of a locally zero-emission “road metro” funded by the Australian government, with local government playing a key role in connecting the city center and suburbs. Consistently referred to as the subway, the concept of bus lanes isolated from other road users (but sometimes shared with other bus services) is most comparable to the GRT systems prevalent in South America. The network, which is 21 kilometers long and consists of two lines (M1 and M2 respectively) and 18 stations, will be served by double-articulated electric buses, which will run with three-minute tracking 24 hours a day. The project, launched in 2016, was first announced in 2017 when the feasibility study was published, and at the end of 2019 it was also decided that the vehicles of the future network would be delivered by Hess, Switzerland, with the help of Volgren, home to the Australian market. Incidentally, the two companies have been cooperating for more than four decades, as both bus manufacturers are building their buses with Co-Bolt technology developed by the Swiss, using bolted aluminum profiles.

For now, the double hinge of the Hess is gliding on the roads of Brisbane only at the level of visual designs

So far, the manufacturer himself has distributed relatively little concrete information about the 24.4-meter-long, purely electric double-joint, but the ordering municipality is proving to be much more communicative about the requirements to be met by vehicles. This means, among other things, that buses will be 2550 mm wide, as is customary in Europe (Australian regulations now only allow a width of 2500 mm by default), 150 passengers in normal passenger conditions and 170 passengers in peak periods, and with a closed cab. and will have at least three full-width double-leaf service doors (in addition, according to the visual designs, an additional single-leaf door will be located in front of the A-axis). For the convenience of the traveling public, on-board WiFi and USB charging points for charging mobile devices will be provided, as well as a large, panoramic rear windshield, which Hess's notoriously expensive top model is just a coincidence.

The B and C axles of bulky vehicles will be driven by permanent magnet synchronous motors, and the D unit will be steered like the front chassis for satisfactory maneuverability relative to the dimensions of the bus. The CCS 2 plug-in charging option will also be available at the vehicle depot, but all-day trouble-free operation is guaranteed primarily by the six-minute lightning charge with the TOSA system provided at the terminals. The charging infrastructure is supplied by ABB.

European testing of the prototype is scheduled to begin later this year, followed by running tests already on the streets of Brisbane, expected from 2022 onwards. If this is successful, the city has the option to call out the remaining 59 cars from the contract. The commissioning of the “metro network” in Brisbane is planned for the second half of 2023, subject to type approvals and other permits.
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