• Advertisement

Sydney Metro - Tallawong to Bankstown

Sydney / New South Wales Transport Discussion

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Tue Jun 25, 2019 8:50 am

Swift wrote:I think the whole issue is the speed limits are too low!

Plus lackadaisical driving - not accelerating to line speed as quickly as possible, not constantly holding the line speed when at it and decelerating too early and too slowly on a station approach, then too-long station dwells, all of which contribute to lowering average speed. Neither the metro (automated) nor Perth (human drivers) suffer from this at all, they use their optimum performance throughout. This seems to be an institutional more than engineering issue in NSW, given that the trains are apparently by specification capable of better performance.

It's the same on the trams here when you compare with the performance of the best systems in Central Europe.
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Linto63 » Tue Jun 25, 2019 8:53 am

tonyp wrote:I know you think I resort to all sorts of dark trickery to present Sydney/NSW Trains in the worst possible light, but in fact I choose the better examples and round up figures so much I should get a job in the railways spin department, all in order to avoid accusations that I'm trying to do the dirty on them.
It's not that I think you manipulate statistics to try and back up your arguments, it's that I know you do. Like this one https://www.busaustralia.com/forum/view ... &start=275 (20 Nov 2017 @ 05:54) where you latched on to a report that buses only recovered 10% of their costs and tried to spin it that if fares were introduced on the Gong Shuttle that it would only bring in $300k when in would have actually brought in at least 10 times that.
Linto63
 
Posts: 981
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2016 2:44 pm
Has thanked: 115 times
Been thanked: 238 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Tue Jun 25, 2019 9:39 am

I suggest that you satisfy yourself by checking through your own research every figure I give.
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Fleet Lists » Tue Jun 25, 2019 4:22 pm

Discussion closed - any more of this will be deleted - this is totally off subject.

Back to NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing please.
Living in the Shire.
User avatar
Fleet Lists
Administrator
 
Posts: 21166
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 11:49 am
Location: The Shire
Has thanked: 1112 times
Been thanked: 1206 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Tue Jun 25, 2019 4:30 pm

Still two Stationlink buses on standby at North Ryde today. Is this an ongoing arrangement - for how long?
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Fleet Lists » Tue Jun 25, 2019 4:54 pm

One post deleted as mentioned above.
Living in the Shire.
User avatar
Fleet Lists
Administrator
 
Posts: 21166
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 11:49 am
Location: The Shire
Has thanked: 1112 times
Been thanked: 1206 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby swtt » Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:24 pm

tonyp wrote:Still two Stationlink buses on standby at North Ryde today. Is this an ongoing arrangement - for how long?
Three at Beecroft this morning, with another two at Epping (Beecroft Rd) plus another two at Epping (Oxford St).

Sent from my Huawei P30 Pro using Tapatalk
User avatar
swtt
 
Posts: 5228
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 4:49 pm
Has thanked: 982 times
Been thanked: 423 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Wed Jun 26, 2019 12:59 pm

From the Minister today: 1.8 million riders in the first month. If, say, 20 million p.a., where does that place it among the suburban lines?
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boronia » Wed Jun 26, 2019 6:31 pm

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/kathleen-lies-ready-to-dig-first-rail-tunnels-under-sydney-harbour-20190626-p521f9.html
Kathleen lies ready to dig first rail tunnels under Sydney Harbour
Matt O'Sullivan
By Matt O'Sullivan
June 26, 2019 — 4.06pm


About 130 metres in length, Kathleen lies in wait about 30m underground at Barangaroo on the western edge of Sydney's central business district.

Within days, the giant tunnel boring machine will begin to churn through clay, sediment and rock on the first of two one-kilometre journeys under Sydney Harbour to build the second stage of the city's multibillion-dollar metro railway.

With four giant boring machines worming their way towards Sydney's CBD from Chatswood in the north and Marrickville in the inner west, the NSW government expects the 15.5km twin tunnels for the second stage of the rail line to be completed by March next year.

Named after Kathleen Butler, who served as a technical adviser to renowned engineer John Bradfield on construction of the Harbour Bridge, the boring machine is specially equipped to tunnel through water-saturated sandstone and sediment.
Advertisement

Slurry from her giant head cutters will be pumped through pipes to a treatment station at Barangaroo where water will be extracted and recycled, and spoil dried before being barged to be used on road projects and building sites.

The first tunnel from Barangaroo to McMahons Point is expected to take up to three months to dig to depths of up to 40m below the harbour.

Inspecting the boring machine on Wednesday, Premier Gladys Berejiklian described the second stage of the metro rail project as the "Northwest Metro on steroids" because it would relieve pressure on existing rail lines and roads in the CBD and elsewhere.
The giant boring machine named Kathleen is almost ready to tunnel under Sydney Harbour from Barangaroo.

The giant boring machine named Kathleen is almost ready to tunnel under Sydney Harbour from Barangaroo. Credit:Bianca De Marchi

"The benefits we have seen for the Northwest Metro will be compounded massively [by the second stage]," she said.

More than 1.8 million passenger trips have been taken on the $7.3 billion Metro Northwest line from Rouse Hill to Chatswood in its first month. On average, 65,000 trips were made each weekday on the line last month.

Mr Berejiklian said it had led to about 20,000 fewer vehicles travelling on the M2 toll road in Sydney's north last month, compared with the same period a year earlier, and a 20 per cent fall in crowding at some stations on the T1 Western Line.

The reduction in traffic on the M2 represents a tiny proportion of the 136,000 vehicles which travel on the toll road each weekday.
A 30-metre shaft to the site of the tunnel boring machine at Barangaroo.

A 30-metre shaft to the site of the tunnel boring machine at Barangaroo.Credit:Bianca De Marchi

But Ms Berejiklian said the figures on the number of people switching from driving to catching trains were conservative, and did not include a reduction in vehicles on local roads in the north west and approaches on the motorway to the Harbour Bridge.

"Once people see how the system is working and how much they can save both in time and dollars ... I think we'll see those figures go up," she said.

"We have always known that the real potential of the congestion busting in terms of the road network will happen once this [second] part of the project is done."

Labor's acting leader, Penny Sharpe, said a reduction of 20,000 vehicles on the M2 was a "drop in the ocean" and there was a long way to go before achieving a significant reduction in traffic.

The second stage of the metro line from Chatswood to the CBD, and onto Sydenham in the south, and Bankstown in the west, is due to be completed by 2024 at a cost of up to $12.5 billion. The government also expects to start construction on a $20 billion metro line from Sydney's CBD to Westmead near Parramatta next year, and complete a metro line from St Marys to the new $5 billion Western Sydney Airport at Badgerys Creek by 2026.
The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2020
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18975
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 281 times
Been thanked: 1809 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Linto63 » Wed Jun 26, 2019 7:48 pm

tonyp wrote:From the Minister today: 1.8 million riders in the first month. If, say, 20 million p.a., where does that place it among the suburban lines?
https://www.transport.nsw.gov.au/data-a ... ly-figures
Linto63
 
Posts: 981
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2016 2:44 pm
Has thanked: 115 times
Been thanked: 238 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby mandonov » Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:13 am

Fascinating about the 20% drop in crowding (is that the same as patronage?) at some T1 stations. I'd imagine that's mostly from people on the Richmond Line switching at the far end, but I could also see a lot of park and riders that may have used the train to Chatswood switching to one of the metro P+R's.
mandonov
 
Posts: 1667
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 8:34 pm
Has thanked: 176 times
Been thanked: 391 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:19 am

mandonov wrote:Fascinating about the 20% drop in crowding (is that the same as patronage?) at some T1 stations. I'd imagine that's mostly from people on the Richmond Line switching at the far end, but I could also see a lot of park and riders that may have used the train to Chatswood switching to one of the metro P+R's.

Labor's decision when obtaining the planning approval (under which the metro was built) for the NWRL in the 2000s to not connect it to Schofields has resulted in an inconvenient connection gap for commuters in the Windsor-Richmond region. Thus park and ride directly from their homes is the only convenient way for them to make the connection. The 751 bus is only a 15 (in peaks) to 30 minute service and I don't know how synchronised it is with Richmond line trains, but it would be a painful inconvenience. In the much longer term it will be solved by extension of the metro to St Marys.
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby neilrex » Fri Jun 28, 2019 1:27 pm

They seem to be obsessed with reductions in driving.

If I had access to CBD parking, there is no way I would be giving that up to travel by train.
neilrex
 
Posts: 640
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:34 pm
Has thanked: 378 times
Been thanked: 67 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby swtt » Fri Jun 28, 2019 3:12 pm

neilrex wrote:They seem to be obsessed with reductions in driving.

If I had access to CBD parking, there is no way I would be giving that up to travel by train.


If you could get into the CBD that is! All access roads into the CBD are basically clogged.

I actually have access to parking almost whenever I like - but still take the train in.
User avatar
swtt
 
Posts: 5228
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 4:49 pm
Has thanked: 982 times
Been thanked: 423 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby neilrex » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:59 pm

mandonov wrote:Fascinating about the 20% drop in crowding (is that the same as patronage?) at some T1 stations. I'd imagine that's mostly from people on the Richmond Line switching at the far end, but I could also see a lot of park and riders that may have used the train to Chatswood switching to one of the metro P+R's.


It's an almost meaningless claim.

Where ?

Schofields ? Seven Hills ? Parramatta ? Pennant Hills ? Eastwood ?
neilrex
 
Posts: 640
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:34 pm
Has thanked: 378 times
Been thanked: 67 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Fleet Lists » Thu Jul 04, 2019 5:53 pm

Can we get back to the North West/Harbour Crossing please - Camden etc is totally off topic in this thread.
Living in the Shire.
User avatar
Fleet Lists
Administrator
 
Posts: 21166
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 11:49 am
Location: The Shire
Has thanked: 1112 times
Been thanked: 1206 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby Fleet Lists » Thu Jul 04, 2019 7:17 pm

The discussion concerned has been moved to viewtopic.php?f=3&t=77410&start=275 which already covers the Western Sydney train proposals for the new airport.
Living in the Shire.
User avatar
Fleet Lists
Administrator
 
Posts: 21166
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 11:49 am
Location: The Shire
Has thanked: 1112 times
Been thanked: 1206 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boronia » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:30 pm

The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2020
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18975
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 281 times
Been thanked: 1809 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boxythingy » Sun Jul 14, 2019 11:12 pm

Are they trying to save electricity like how they have to in Pyongyang? Note how only some lights turn on

Are these USB sockets supposed to twist? Can't believe these trains are falling apart already

Can't believe they still can't get the right bus route numbers correct

These are really bad attempts at emulating the Sydney Trains PID station list scroll

Well at least some contents have now loaded, can't blame them considering the state of NBN

Is it possible to evacuate from a moving train?
:!: Just as Socialism with Chinese Characteristics = Joke = Rapid Transit with Sydney Characteristics
User avatar
boxythingy
 
Posts: 3627
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 2:48 pm
Has thanked: 1772 times
Been thanked: 274 times
Favourite Vehicle: Former G-Set Tangara

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boronia » Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:55 am

Swift wrote:
Transtopic wrote:My sentiments exactly when I regularly caught even the U-boats from Eastwood to the CBD.

Those things were even faster, or felt it due to their comparative lack of insulation from the outside. The drivers weren't afraid to pelt them through the curves from Epping to Hornsby, with lots of rocking to and fro as well as side to side! Tonyp will appreciate that part.

One of the last U set rosters was a 4 car set from Newy to Sydney mid afternoon. The run down down through Wyee was a great experience if the driver let it run (which most did). The bogies on these were always rough, they put some shock absorbers on them at one stage but that didn't detract from the experience.
The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2020
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18975
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 281 times
Been thanked: 1809 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boronia » Wed Jul 17, 2019 10:24 pm

I wonder if the metro time keeping problems are related to their clocks being 12 hours slow/fast?
DSC03505 (Small).jpeg
DSC03505 (Small).jpeg (83.8 KiB) Viewed 2785 times
The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2020
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18975
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 281 times
Been thanked: 1809 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Thu Jul 18, 2019 6:58 am

boronia wrote:I wonder if the metro time keeping problems are related to their clocks being 12 hours slow/fast?
DSC03505 (Small).jpeg

Most likely somebody has left the "settings" on the 12 hour clock, so it's a "pm" time!
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby matthewg » Thu Jul 18, 2019 7:31 am

tonyp wrote:
Most likely somebody has left the "settings" on the 12-hour clock, so it's a "pm" time!


The signs are obviously not being done by a local. The grammar is reminiscent of 'Chinglish' as seen on English language signs in SE Asia and in many manuals for Chinese built equipment I have. MTR must have got the office back in Hong Kong to do the signs. The MTR person doing the signs 'knows' that in English we don't use 24hr time so set up the screen appropriately. They have never actually been to Sydney and seen the Sydney Trains signs that are in 24hr time.
matthewg
 
Posts: 1563
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2012 1:11 pm
Has thanked: 87 times
Been thanked: 372 times

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby boronia » Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:00 am

The strange thing about this is that the platform signs are in 24 hr format. It is disappointing that nobody from either agency is checking that signage is working correctly.

And usually in 12 hr format, the leading zero is not used.
The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2020
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18975
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 281 times
Been thanked: 1809 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: NSW Future Rail Plan - NWRL/Metro/Harbour Crossing

Postby tonyp » Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:20 am

mandonov wrote:Fascinating about the 20% drop in crowding (is that the same as patronage?) at some T1 stations. I'd imagine that's mostly from people on the Richmond Line switching at the far end, but I could also see a lot of park and riders that may have used the train to Chatswood switching to one of the metro P+R's.


This comment in this press release has had me contemplating for a while too. Presumably when they say "T1" they mean the Richmond line, as it would be unlikely that the metro would rob many commuters from the Western line. Since then I've been doing more work on my comparative journey-time tables, focussing now on the longer distances. We've seen that, over shorter to medium distances on the Perth/Sydney Metro vs Sydney Trains/other cities systems, the former two "rapid transit" systems have journey time/average speed leads over the Sydney suburban system of, typically between 5 to 10 minutes and 5 to 10 km/h over distances of around 15 and 30 km with a similar number of stations.

In line with accepted "definitions" too, the rapid transit systems by their nature are achieving this while stopping at every station while, by the time you get to the 30 km distance, the suburban systems (in other cities as well as Sydney) are having to semi-express/skip stops to achieve their journey times. Indeed, contrary to the conventional wisdom about metro-type vs suburban systems, the further the distance travelled by the rapid transit/metro system, the bigger its journey time lead, considering the added convenience of all stops. This does indeed tend to undermine some conventional thinking about the traditional (inconvenient for commuters) mix of semi-express and all-stops trains that require interchange.

In order to throw some light on the NW Sydney situation, I've boosted the coverage of the 47 km distance at which I can make some direct comparisons between systems. By this stage we are out on the urban fringes of the typical spread-out Australian large cities and there is not much housing within walking distance of stations, so commuters' choices about how they get to a station revolve more around the P+R or the feeder bus. This means, especially if driving, they have more flexibility in which station they choose to park and ride at. In this light, I think the original question is mainly answered by looking at those comparative trip times to the Sydney CBD from Riverstone vs Tallawong (both the same distance from Central, with the metro making five more stops through to Central compared to the Riverstone train). The difference is presently negligible and, when the metro line is completed into the CBD, that trip is going to be 10 minutes or more faster. I think this is going to make a significant difference to the Richmond line which will adjust more to a role of serving significant centres like Blacktown, Westmead and Parramatta rather than Sydney. I would add Burwood to that list except for that diabolical express vs all-stops factor meaning that Richmond trains bypass Burwood and subject commuters to the inconvenience of changing to an all-stops.

47 km segment (E=skipping stops train; ICE=intercity express train):

Perth:
Perth-Warnbro: 9 stops, 38 mins (74 km/h)
Clarkson-Murdoch: 13 stops, 49 mins (57 km/h)
(after subtracting 2 minute stop at Perth)

Sydney Metro:
Tallewong-Central: 17 stops, 50 mins (56 km/h)
(projected time after subtracting 2 minute stop at Epping)
(* note that present time between Tallawong and Central is around 60 mins with interchange at Chatswood)

Sydney Suburban:
Riverstone-Redfern: E 11 stops, 55 mins (51 km/h)
St Marys-Redfern: E 9 stops, 50 mins (55 km/h)
Macarthur-Central: E 15 stops, 60 mins (47 km/h)
(after subtracting 2 minute stop at Glenfield)

Sydney Interurban:
Thirroul-Bombo: ICE 9 stops, 48-54 mins (52-58 km/h)

Brisbane Interurban:
Beenleigh-Varsity Lakes (49 km): ICE 5 stops, 32 mins (91 km/h)


(Bear in mind that the T1 and T8 times are to Redfern/Central only whereas the metro times are to Central so, as most city commuters would actually be riding into CBD stations, the time advantage to the metro is even greater.)

I feel that this sort of analysis does reinforce the conclusion that the double deck suburban services are at their best when they don't actually have to stop (the syndrome of the hospital without patients in "Yes Minister"). It's pretty savage for Sydney Trains when they have to miss heaps of stops to be even remotely competitive with another system that stops at every station or, in the case of Perth's Mandurah line, Sydney Trains are 10 to 15 minutes (and average up to 20 km/h) slower than a Perth train with the same number of stops.

While I accept that the double deck trains are capable of better performance (and I regularly reference the 1980s timetables when they were at their best, so I've seen what that is), I am deeply sceptical that they will ever be able to close such substantial performance gaps. A few minutes maybe, but not the whole gap. A little clue is also to be found in the last volume of John Dunn's Comeng history where one of the famous double-deck guru's last jobs was to design a double deck train for the Melbourne system (where they placed a lot of value on dwell time). John ended up designing a double deck train with three doors per side per car because he knew that a two-door train would disrupt the services if run mixed in between the three-door single deck trains. From the horse's mouth.

The other factor is that it takes some pretty long distances for a higher maximum speed to produce results, so the potential for 130 km/h doesn't actually count for much over most of the suburban system, except where expressing (that is, missing stops and inconveniencing a lot of your pax). I've uncovered this a little more in comparing the Perth system with the Sydney metro and finding that the metro performance is stacking up even better against the Perth system than I originally thought - up to a certain station spacing. So Perth's capacity for 110-130 km/h doesn't produce that much more result compared to the metro's 100 km/h when there are stops less than maybe up to 3-4 km apart. Quite obviously the trains don't get the opportunity to get up to maximum speed for long before they have to slow down again. Where the maximum speed comes more into play is on the Mandurah line where the station spacings are typically over 5 km. There are no such spacings on the Sydney suburban except between Heathcote and Waterfall and I reproduce below the tabulation I prepared for that section. I've added the average speeds in km per minute to make an accurate comparison since the distances are slightly different on each system:

6 km non-stop segment between stations:

Perth:
Murdoch-Cockburn Central (6.7 km): 4 mins (100 km/h) (1.67 km/min) (speed limit 130 km/h)

Sydney Metro:
Epping-Cherrybrook (6.2 km): 4 mins (93 km/h) (1.55 km/min) (speed limit 100 km/h)

Sydney Suburban:
Heathcote-Waterfall (5.6 km): 4-5 mins (67-84 km/h) (1.12-1.4 km/min) (speed limit 115 km/h)

Brisbane Interurban:
Ormeau-Coomera (6.8 km): 4-5 mins (81-102 km/h) (1.36-1.7 km/min) (speed limit 140 km/h)


To come back to the original point, I think commuters are cottoning on to this issue, which explains why they would be drifting from using the Richmond line across to the metro. Journey time is far more significant for commuters than some people here are giving it credit for.
Perpetually on a T3 to "I. P. Pavlova, přestup na Metro. Příští zastávka, Náměsti Míru"
User avatar
tonyp
 
Posts: 8979
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:31 am
Location: Shoalhaven
Has thanked: 1200 times
Been thanked: 1271 times

PreviousNext


  • Advertisement

Return to Discussion - Sydney / NSW

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: aussiedrum, boronia, Campbelltown busboy, mubd, Transtopic and 12 guests