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Canberra light rail: Development applications approved in 'b

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Canberra light rail: Development applications approved in 'b

Postby Rclasstramcar » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:29 am

"Canberra's light rail project has cleared a major planning hurdle, with development applications now approved for the link from Gungahlin to the city, and a possible link between the city and Russell.

Construction on the Gungahlin line is scheduled to start next year - but the project's future is still unclear, as the Canberra Liberals have promised to axe it if they win next October's ACT election.

Capital Metro Minister Simon Corbell said the approvals were a "big step forward" for the project.

He said the Environment and Planning Directorate received 22 submissions from the public during the consultation process.

"The directorate has considered all submissions in making their decision to approve the DAs," he said.

Mr Corbell said getting an approval for the optional Russell extension meant the ACT Government was in the best position possible if it decided to go ahead with the project.

He said the proposed Russell extension had received strong support from the local business industry and the ACT community.

"From Russell we would be perfectly placed to extend the light rail network to other key parts of our city, including the airport, the parliamentary triangle and other destinations south of the lake," Mr Corbell said.

The light rail project still needs development approval from federal planners, for the sections to be built on national land, which are controlled by the National Capital Authority (NCA).

"Approval for parts of the project on land that falls under the National Capital Plan, such as parts of Northbourne Avenue and Constitution Avenue, will be lodged with the NCA in coming months," he said.

Earlier this month the Canberra Liberals released their own alternative vision for the future of public transport in the ACT.

The options paper put forward outlined three alternatives to light rail for Northbourne Avenue, with buses either travelling in a dedicated lane in the centre median or through priority lanes at major intersections between Antill Street and Barry Drive.

"The Government did a deal with the Greens in order to get light rail off the ground, but that's not going to be the genesis of our transport planning," Opposition transport spokesman Alistair Coe said at the time.

"Our transport planning is going to be based on genuine options, genuine cost-benefit analysis and genuine consultation with the community."

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-22/c ... ed/7047422

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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby tonyp » Thu Mar 31, 2016 11:09 am

The Liberals have brought out an alternative proposal to the light rail:

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-new ... ntpvt.html

It includes this artwork of a RHD European-style 100% low floor, multi entry MB Citaro artic:

Image

The drawings look very professional. Anybody have any idea of who authored them and if MB had anything to do with it? There is currently a rigid MB Citaro on demonstration in Brisbane.
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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby PaxInfo » Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:59 pm

tonyp wrote:The Liberals have brought out an alternative proposal to the light rail:

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-new ... ntpvt.html


Some quick thoughts:

The good: 1. Same routes 7 days/week. 2. More Rapid routes. 3. Reducing circuitous bus routes. 4. Reintroduction of after 10pm service (Thurs Fri Sat only) 5. Simple route numbers. 6. A political party using frequency as a selling point.

The bad/doubtful: 1. Weekend frequency of Rapid routes a mix of 15 & 20 min making connections unpredictable. 2. Patronage on some routes may not justify frequent service (eg south-east part of Route 5 in middle of day) 3. Some of their long peak express routes may have poor boardings per kilometre, especially when there will be no disincentives to driving - to quote: "We will not try to force patronage growth by making it harder to drive a car" 4. Apparently no improvement to weekday local routes where service will remain every 30 - 120 min.

The impossible: 1. 'We will keep every bus stop' vs 'reducing number of circuitous bus routes'

The interesting

Take this quote from the policy: "By placing the passenger experience at the centre of decision making".

Compare with: "Key to our success will be putting customers at the centre of our decision making process" from http://www.transdev.com.au/index.php?ma ... eturnid=36

The new Rapid routes will carry high costs, and the claim that no bus stop will be lost means they can't rationalise existing routes to offset some of this. They may see a shift to a private contract or franchise as a way to release funds for improvements if ACTION's existing cost structure is considered too high. I wouldn't be surprised if potential private operators have already been consulted, with some of the language flowing through to the policy document.

Past record

The proponents of the above policy presided over the 1996 service cuts from which the ACTION network never really recovered (the 1998 network was a short blip, followed by a resumption of the pattern of cutting). In the late 1980s/early 1990s most areas had routes every 15 min peak / 30 min offpeak. That had fallen to 30 min peak / 60 min peak (admittedly over a larger area) by the late '90s. Plus many regular routes were discontinued in favour of separate weekend / night bus routes. Although to their credit they largely retained after 10 pm service (this was severely cut much more recently under the current government).
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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby Bus 400 » Sat Apr 02, 2016 3:42 pm

tonyp wrote:The drawings look very professional. Anybody have any idea of who authored them and if MB had anything to do with it? There is currently a rigid MB Citaro on demonstration in Brisbane.


In the pdf file, it mentions the drawings were provided by MB.
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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby tonyp » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:25 am

Bus 400 wrote:
In the pdf file, it mentions the drawings were provided by MB.

So I wonder what would have triggered MB to do such detailed work on a bus concept specifically for Canberra? The Liberal party wouldn't have the professional knowledge to go into such detail, unless they were advised by somebody in the anti-tram camp with the technical and operational knowledge. Or could it have come via ACTION?

MB from their European experience would know how to present a bus that can do the work of a small tram (this type of bus is a standard citybus in Europe), but in this case there must have been some technically informed link-up with somebody in Canberra. To date, a 100% low floor chassis that can take a door behind the rear axle in RHD (as opposed to LHD) is practically non-existent as, so far, there has been no demand for the concept in LHD markets. This is more significant than meets the eye.
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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby gld59 » Fri Apr 08, 2016 5:59 pm

tonyp wrote:So I wonder what would have triggered MB to do such detailed work on a bus concept specifically for Canberra?

I'm thinking there are literally two layers going on there -
1. the RHD-appropriate layout, which would be suitable for any RHD market, and
2. the Canberra-specific livery.
If MB have any sense, number 2 is a readily replaceable layer in the graphics image file.

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Re: Canberra light rail: Development applications approved i

Postby tonyp » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:01 am

It looks like the progress of the tram project is not going to be politically impeded thank goodness.
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Re: Canberra light rail, property values

Postby Roderick Smith » Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:21 pm

Roderick.

Canberra’s light rail could drive up property values along tram line May 18, 2016.
A number of suburbs set to reap the benefits of Canberra’s light rail route have already experienced a spike in value.
The ACT government’s Capital Metro line from Gungahlin Town Centre to the city is expected to drive more buyers to properties along the transport corridor and potentially boost home values, experts say.
This includes commercial real estate in the inner north, with the planned first route already enticing possible buyers and tenants.
Last month the ACT government signed the $710-million light rail contract with Pacific Partnerships-led consortium Canberra Metro to build and operate the tramline.
Harrison, Franklin, Watson and Downer have experienced a spike in their median home values since the business case for the project was approved by the government in 2014 – and they are set to record further growth.
The four suburbs are among those along the corridor furthest from the city and without major transport hubs, such as in Gungahlin or Dickson.
Harrison’s median house and unit value has surged by almost 40 per cent from $400,000 in 2014 to $557,000 in 2015. Six months into 2016 the median value is at $608,500, according to Allhomes data.
Similarly, Franklin’s median home value has increased from $409,000 in 2014 to $419,000 in 2015, sitting at $433,950 as of June, 2016.
By 2020 the suburb’s median is expected to hit $489,566, an almost 13 per cent jump in value, based on the compound annual growth rate drawn from the past four years.
Forecasting Harrison’s growth is more difficult due to fluctuating house prices over this period however, the same method places its median at $774,572 by 2018.
Both suburbs have undergone accelerating development in the past few years with a surge in the number of apartments built along Flemington Road.
Further south, Watson’s median has jumped 12 per cent from $545,000 in 2014 to $612,000 as of June, 2016. Downer’s median has also increased by 12 per cent from $607,500 to $680,000 over the same period.
Watson could jump to $816,502 in four years, while Downer could reach $867,470, based on the rate of compound annual growth.
Domain chief economist Andrew Wilson said the introduction of light rail would “absolutely” impact on the value of homes close to the public transport corridor.
While it was difficult to quantify the exact impact on house prices at this stage, he said the introduction of light rail would “only be positive for the local housing market”.
“You’re always likely to have an increase in buyers, rather than a decrease, in areas with high levels of transport infrastructure,” he said.
Dr Wilson cited the introduction of light rail in Western Sydney as a good comparison, describing it as a positive addition to a booming suburban area.
In the United States, land values within 800 metres of mass transit have risen by as much as 120 per cent, according to a paper released in 2010 by the lobby group the Tourism and Transport Forum.
Allhomes data analyst Nicola Powell said improvements to public transport elsewhere had increased the value of nearby land.
While areas like Gungahlin did not experience the kind of congestion problems that hamper traffic flow in some other Australian cities like Sydney, light rail could push up prices.
“I do think we will see an increase in demand and that might translate to property price growth in that area,” she said
“Wherever the [tram] stops are, we’re likely see a flow-on effect in terms of the economic benefit and increasing demand for property in the area.”
Dr Powell expected increasing value around Flemington Road – home to four proposed tram stops –-if demand for property in the area kept pace with residential development.
She also expected the eventual sale of land in the new suburb of Kenny, east of Mitchell and next to the light rail route, to come with a hefty price tag.
JLL’s ACT Head of Sales and Investments, Michael Heather said although it was too early to analyse the sale price of commercial buildings along the light rail corridor – such as the $29.2 million sale of 73 Northbourne Avenue to a Melbourne investor in April – Capital Metro had piqued the interest of buyers.
The seven-storey building sold for $17 million in 2004, according to Allhomes data, representing a jump of almost $13 million over 12 years.
Details of CBRE’s sale of a large slice of prime real estate at 92 Northbourne Avenue, right on the Elouera Street tram stop, are imminent and the site should fetch more than $20 million.
Meanwhile, the developer behind Midtown this week described the light project as a “catalyst” for the mixed-use precinct, which will be located next to the Macarthur Avenue tram stop.
Further south, the relocation of ANU students from Fenner Hall in 2018, the same year stage one of the light rail project is expected to be completed, could open up a prime development opportunity.
“When dealing with Melbourne and Sydney-based groups, particularly because they see light rail or proposed light rail in their own cities, it is relevant and it is topical,” Mr Heather said.
“The general consensus is it will have a positive impact on the Canberra property market and values and future leases of office assets situated on the light rail route.”
Mr Heather said the city’s diminishing reliance on cars as a result of light rail could also spark a movement of workers from the city’s “fringe” areas, such as Deakin and Fyshwick, to Northbourne Avenue.
“Particularly as tenants come to the end of leases expiring in the next two to three years during first phase of the Capital Metro project,” he said.
“They may look at moving into city given the employee benefit of travelling to work via the public transport system produced by the light rail project.”
He expected private development to also accelerate near the light rail terminals, activating Northbourne Avenue at a street level.
Light rail has been a key policy among ACT Labor and the ACT Greens since the last territory election four years ago.
Construction is scheduled to begin midway through this year and trams are expected to begin taking passengers in early 2019.
The ACT Liberals have been strongly opposed to light rail, promising to scrap the project if elected to office after Canberrans head to the polls in October.
How we calculated the figures:
To forecast, we calculated the compound annual growth rate based on the median home value of each suburb over the past four years.
The compound annual growth rate looks at the average annual change over a set period of years to determine a steady rate of growth.
It’s important to keep in mind this is based on historical data and that values, such as home values, might fluctuate in the future.
http://www.domain.com.au/news/canberras ... 617-gowyke
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