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Corporate jets vs airlines

General Transport Discussion not specific to one state

Corporate jets vs airlines

Postby Roderick Smith » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:00 pm

June 18 2015 Aerial gridlock: Corporate jets demand same spot in queue as airlines .
International airlines fear plans to allow corporate jets to join them in the pecking order for landings at Australia's busiest airports in Sydney and Melbourne will force more of their large aircraft to be diverted to other airports when the skies are in a state of gridlock.
The airlines complain that "unnecessary diversions" disrupt large numbers of passengers – some A380s carry more than 500 people – and damage the reputation of the country's tourism industry.
So far, corporate jets have been classified as "general aviation", putting them at the back of the queue.
They estimate it costs up to $100,000 each time an aircraft is diverted because passengers have to be put up in hotels and on alternative flights, while the flow-on effects to their networks can take days to clear.
The bunfight between corporate-jet owners and commerical airlines highlights the growing problems facing airports in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, which are forecast to hit their limits for handling aircraft during peak periods within the next seven years.
Corporate-jet owners want to get the same status as unscheduled commercial aircraft.
Following industry lobbying, the federal Department of Infrastructure has proposed altering rules to allow corporate jets to be promoted in the queue to join commercial airlines.
Back of the queue. Apart from emergencies, rescue and aircraft carrying state dignitaries, air-traffic controllers usually allow planes to land on a "first-come, first served basis". However, at capital cities – especially Sydney – commercial jetliners are given priority over corporate jets and small planes flown for recreational purposes.
Historically, corporate jets have been classified as "general aviation", putting them at the back of the queue.
The Australian Business Aircraft Association has called for corporate jets to get the same status at Sydney Airport as unscheduled commercial aircraft, citing incidents where air-traffic controllers sent planes that had been in a holding pattern and low on fuel to another airport unsuitable for a "high-performance aircraft".
However, the Board of Airline Representatives of Australia, which lobbies on behalf of carriers such as Emirates, Singapore Airlines, Qantas and Cathay Pacific, emphasised that many large planes can't remain in holding patterns for long periods because of the vast distances they have already flown.
Flight times from the US, Canada and the Persian Gulf can be up to 14 hours, which means the large aircraft often have to be diverted to other airports because they cannot circle airports for long periods.
Diversions costly. Air New Zealand has raised concerns that the issue of prioritising flights had been "overly domestic centric".
"Creating a process that significantly increases the risks of diversion of large [regular passenger transport] aircraft ... is counter to the safety objective and also counter economically," the airline said.
Air New Zealand cited a recent example where one of its Boeing 777s that was flying to Sydney from Auckland was forced to divert to Melbourne because it would have been placed in a holding pattern.
It resulted in the airline copping costs of $NZ100,000 ($90,000) for accommodating passengers who had missed their connecting flights, ground handling fees in Melbourne and burning more jet fuel.
The problems of diverting aircraft are often compounded because, unlike many countries such as the US and the UK, Australia often lacks alternative airports capable of handling large aircraft.
Sydney Airport has a cap of 80 aircraft movements an hour, and it has been forecast that all of its landing slots on weekdays between 6am and 12pm, and from 4pm to 7pm, will be full by 2020.
A number of corporate jets and small freighters are allowed to land and take off during the airport's curfew between 11pm and 6am. These aircraft have to take off and land over Botany Bay to minimise noise disturbance.
Domestic focused. The International Air Transport Association also said a report from the Department of Infrastructure was "overly focused on Australian domestic aircraft operations" and had failed to take into account the operational difficulties for ultra long-haul flights.
The peak global airline body said the proposed changes would result in air-traffic controllers treating all aircraft the same when planes were stuck in holding patterns above congested airports.
IATA emphasised that more than 900 passengers could be disrupted when an A380 was forced to divert to another airport because the airline had to put them up in hotels.
It wants priority to be given to land for passenger jetliners that had already left their airport of origin when air-traffic controllers put planes in holding patterns at their destinations because of congestion.
www.theage.com.au/business/aviation/aer ... hqunx.html
Roderick Smith
 
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