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Population growth

General Transport Discussion not specific to one state

Population growth

Postby Roderick Smith » Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:33 am

170318Sa Melbourne 'Herald Sun' - population growth.

Roderick
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Re: Population growth

Postby eddy » Fri Mar 24, 2017 1:43 am

That is why we should start building three tunnels connecting Melbourne, Albury, Canberra and Sydney now so in ten years a maglev train can make them 15 minutes apart and take the pressure off Sydney and Melbourne
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Re: Population growth

Postby Roderick Smith » Sun Apr 16, 2017 8:34 pm

March 23 2017 Victoria fills up as the rest of the nation - including Sydneysiders - moves in .
In the past 12 months, 82,800 Australians have moved to Victoria from interstate, around 500 carloads a week.
At the same time, 65,600 Victorians have left.
Melbourne and Victoria are popular places to live. Photo: Darrian Traynor .
The gap - a net influx of 17,200 - is an all-time record. Victoria's population is being swelled by more migrants from interstate than ever before, and by far more than any other state, even Queensland, which used to be the go-to state for the rest of nation.
Perhaps as a result, or perhaps as a driver, employment in Victoria has surged by 97,300 in the past year, accounting for almost all of the nationwide employment growth of 104,600.
In contrast, the once-booming jobs market in NSW produced only 2000 extra workers.
New population figures show that a jump in interstate migration, in overseas migration and in births lifted Victoria's population by 157,500 to 6.1 million in the year to September - an increase of 2.1 per cent, compared to 1.2 per cent in the rest of the nation.
Victoria now accounts for 25.2 per cent of Australia's population, the most since the share slid during the early 1990s recession.
Net foreign migration to Victoria reached a record 68,600 in the year to September. The natural increase (births minus deaths) reached 41,700, also a record high.
Domestic migrants to Victoria came predominantly from NSW (29,500), Queensland (15,200) Western Australia (11,500) and South Australia (9700).
The main destinations for Victorians moving interstate were NSW (23,600), Queensland (20,800) and Western Australia (7100).
Bureau of Statistics projections released with the population figures show Melbourne overtaking Sydney as Australia's biggest city in 2056.
The central projection puts Melbourne's population at 8.2 million, almost double the present 4.6 million, and Sydney's at 8.1 million, up from 5 million.
The slower growth in Sydney reflects congestion and geographical constraints of the sea and a mountain range.
By 2056, Victoria is projected to have a total population of 9.9 million and NSW 11.1 million.
A faster growth scenario has Melbourne well above Sydney at 9.2 million to 8.4 million, and a slower growth scenario has Sydney slightly ahead of Melbourne at 7.7 million to 7.4 million.
Australia's population is projected to be somewhere between 35 million and 45 million. The central projection is 39.7 million, up from the present 24.3 million.
www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/poli ... v4tm4.html
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Re: Population growth

Postby eddy » Sun Apr 23, 2017 1:11 pm

And as we like to live in big cities making Albury 15 minutes from Melbourne and Canberra 15 minutes from Sydney would be best.
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Re: Population growth

Postby eddy » Sun Apr 30, 2017 11:57 am

Sent this email to Scott Morrison Saturday

Hi Scott

Regarding borrowing for good debt, as soon as the first sod is turned for Magtube making Albury 15 minutes from Melbourne and Canberra 15 minutes from Sydney property prices in Albury and Canberra would rise therefore to contribute to the $35b cost it would be fair to have a Maglevy on Albury and Canberra every time a property is sold.

The world wants a 1,000kph train but Japan is limited to 500kph by air resistance while China and Korea haven't our mining expertise so it is a golden opportunity for us to develop the technology while taking the pressure off Sydney and Melbourne.

Regards Eddy
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Re: Population growth

Postby eddy » Sat May 20, 2017 4:28 pm

Got this encouraging letter today.

“The Government also announced in its 2017 budget that it will encourage the development of proposals for faster passenger rail services between our big cities and nearby regional centres. It will call for the submission of formal proposals, and assess them to support the development of formal business cases. The Government will provide $20 million in 2017-18 to support this initiative. The finalised business cases may have the opportunity to attract Government project funding in future years. Proponents of innovative technologies, such as Magtube, will be able to participate in this process.”
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Re: City growth

Postby Roderick Smith » Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:18 pm

Roderick

Australia’s fastest growing suburbs are on city fringes, new figures show
Mar 30, 2016 Experts are concerned an extraordinary number of people moving to Melbourne's fringe may not be provided with good access to employment and services. Photo: Paul Rovere
The number of people living on Melbourne and Sydney’s fringes is continuing to explode at a rapid rate, with new data showing outer suburbs in the two cities are growing larger and faster than the rest of the country.
Cranbourne East in Melbourne’s southern growth corridor was the country’s largest growing and second-fastest expanding suburb, ballooning by 88 people per week last financial year, Australian Bureau of Statistics figures released on Wednesday show.
Sydney’s high-rise hot spot Waterloo was the fifth largest growing suburb, with the number of residents in the high density area increasing by about 60 people a week between June 2014 and June 2015.
Developments such as Selandra Rise in Cranbourne have attracted buyers with affordable housing options. Photo: Wayne Taylor
Perth suburbs Baldivis and Forrestdale were also among the top Australian suburbs attracting the most people.
Melbourne is officially the fastest growing capital city in Australia, with about 1760 people moving to the Victorian capital each week. The city added 830,000 residents over the past ten years, according to SGS Economics and Planning.
But with the city’s growth corridors in the north, west and south dominating the population boom for the second year in a row, some experts are concerned by the trend.
Cranbourne East is popular with migrants and young families because of the price point and larger block sizes, according to agents. Photo: Wayne Taylor.
RMIT University professor of environment and planning Michael Buxton said the extraordinary numbers showed the state government was failing to properly monitor growth through meaningful policies.
“What they are doing is just sitting back approving large numbers of developments and they are not intervening to redirect development [to established suburbs],” Professor Buxton said.
“Rising house prices in the established city are continuing to drive large numbers of people to fringe. [Buyers] are paying relatively low prices for property, but end up paying big time for running costs and likely achieve minimal capital growth.”
The spread of Melbourne’s population change from 2014 to 2015. Photo: SGS Economics and Planning.
Monash University professor Bob Birrell said there was continued strong demand for detached housing in Melbourne’s outer suburbs, which was half due to Victoria’s larger share of net migration from both overseas and interstate.
“Melbourne is still booming, despite the decline in the birth rate and a decline in national net overseas migration,” Dr Birrell said.
Domain Group data showed house prices in growing suburbs had lifted over the period, albeit modestly. Cranbourne East’s house price median was $418,750 – a 4.7 per cent increase.
But low medians and moderate growth are typical of areas that attracted migrants and first home buyers, according to Domain Group chief economist Andrew Wilson.
“Isn’t that part of driving force anyway? Affordability,” Dr Wilson said. “These are Melbourne’s growth areas and they show first home buyers are happily heading to the fringe.”
Hodges chief executive Carmel Baker said Cranbourne East was popular with migrants and young families because of the price point and larger block sizes.
“The whole Cranbourne region, in particular the Cranbourne East region, has been growing steadily year on year,” Ms Baker said, noting that the agency was now looking to open another franchise in the area due to popularity.
“Values are also increasing quite strongly in the area,” she said.
SGS Economics and Planning economist Terry Rawnsley said he was concerned by the distribution of the population growth.
“The fact Melbourne’s economy has been robust enough to support over 830,000 new residents over the past ten years is a real positive,” he said.
“[But] relying on high density in the inner Melbourne and low density on the fringe doesn’t produce good economic or social outcomes.
“The latter does not provide good access to employment and services, whereas the former, provides only a limited range of housing stock.”
http://www.domain.com.au/news/australia ... 330-gnt6ld
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Re: Population growth

Postby eddy » Sun Jun 25, 2017 3:47 pm

As Malcolm is interested in Magtube I sent him a copy of the letter I sent to the Infrastructure Investment Division Rail Policy and Planning Branch

Hi James
Thank you for including Magtube to be eligible to apply for the formal business case, Australians would love to see a privately operated government owned asset that earns $2b per year for the next 200 years.

Using the NWRL tunnel cost of $37,000 per metre it would cost $30b for the tunnels and $5b for the magtrack with each participating state contributing $500m per year matched by the federal government over the ten years it takes to build it.

China and Korea are about to develop the next generation of 1,000kph trains and Magtube will allow this by simply reducing air resistance with an exhaust valve both ends of each of the three tunnels.

Southbound trains would be in stations for 15 minutes while northbound are in the tunnels and vice versa allowing a 5.6m wide 2,000 seat train to leave Sydney and Melbourne every half hour e.g.

Leave Sydney 6.00----------------Arrive Canberra 6.15
Leave Canberra 6.30 -------------Arrive Albury 6.45
Leave Albury 7.00------------------Arrive Melbourne 7.15

Leave Melbourne 6.15------------Arrive Albury 6.30
Leave Albury 6.45------------------Arrive Canberra 7.00
Leave Canberra 7.15------- -------Arrive Sydney 7.30

Resulting in a one seat ride end to end of one and a quarter hours every half hour.
Leaving Sydney 6.00, 6.30, 7.00, 7.30, 8.00, 830, 9.00 etc
Leaving Melbourne 6.15, 6.45, 7.15, 7.45, 8.15, 8.45, 9.15 etc.

Enclosed is a copy of the letter you sent me.

Regards Eddy Barnett
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