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Bus Model numbers

General Transport Discussion not specific to one state

scania buses/coaches

Postby Ben_Daui » Thu Nov 18, 2004 10:40 pm

as we know the state transit uses diesel powerd 14.5m & the low floor version not the prototype, and the murrys coaches that go between canberra & sydney do these all the same motor?,it seems the 14.5 gets off the line quicker?murrys coach sounds exactly like the 14.5 except with a gearbox not a push button auto,low floor seems turbo is more high pitched then other buses and these buses do have diffrent handling to but the bus i would have to say is the best overall is the 14.5 so are these the same engine just diffrent frame & chassis setup?
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Postby boronia » Sun Dec 05, 2004 1:00 pm

I think you will find that the Murray's 4 axle coaches use the same basic engine, but with a higher power rating
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sta

Postby Mercedes » Wed Feb 23, 2005 8:55 pm

Hello Ben I reading ur post the sta 14.5m have a L113TRBL the murrays coaches would be a K something or other while yes they sound the same they would be totaly different. as for the low floors the sta ones are L113CRL's euro2. Where as I could be wrong the prototype 3511 or what ever number it is is a L113CRL for sure but unsure weather it is a euro1 version or what. They sound different yet the same engine coz of the emission control units on them.
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Postby scott » Thu Feb 24, 2005 7:39 pm

In my experience, the way to tell the difference between a Euro 1 L113CRL and and Euro 2 is the engine sound.


All of the Ventura L113CRLs with the exception of #119(flipper) and #147, (the first of the Northcoast units built in 1998) are Euro 1, The other two have Euro 2 engines, that as Merc said, have a different emission control system, as well as a different engine management system, I love the engine sound of #119 and #147.
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sta

Postby Mercedes » Fri Mar 04, 2005 7:44 pm

Can someone tell me is the sta prototype low floor I think it is 3511 does that have the euro 2 engine or the euro 1?
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Postby Simes » Fri Mar 04, 2005 9:18 pm

According to the bus fleet info page

http://www.sydneybuses.info/busfleet/sb.bus23.html

3511 has a Euro 2 engine

there are only 3 Scania L113's in the STA fleet with Euro 1 engines, they being 3713, 14, 15 all at Randwick....
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Re: sta

Postby Windy » Sun Apr 03, 2005 7:53 am

Mercedes143 wrote:Hello Ben I reading ur post the sta 14.5m have a L113TRBL the murrays coaches would be a K something or other while yes they sound the same they would be totaly different. as for the low floors the sta ones are L113CRL's euro2. Where as I could be wrong the prototype 3511 or what ever number it is is a L113CRL for sure but unsure weather it is a euro1 version or what. They sound different yet the same engine coz of the emission control units on them.


Howdy Merc 143!

There is no such thing as a TRBL classification. It is either TRB or TRL (L = low floor, B = stepped entrance) But those Murrays long buses sure hammer (they are K113TRBs)!
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Postby Tom_G » Sun Apr 03, 2005 8:24 am

There is no such thing as a TRBL classification.


According to the Nowra Coaches Fleetlisthttp://www.busaustralia.com/fleetlists/nowra.htm. TV-1996 is a Scania K113TRBL/PMCSA. If TRBL is incorrect would TV-1996 be just a K113TRB?

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Postby Windy » Mon Apr 04, 2005 4:58 am

Lukzor_1 wrote:
There is no such thing as a TRBL classification.


According to the Nowra Coaches Fleetlisthttp://www.busaustralia.com/fleetlists/nowra.htm. TV-1996 is a Scania K113TRBL/PMCSA. If TRBL is incorrect would TV-1996 be just a K113TRB?

Tom


Yes.
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Postby OLYMPIAN » Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:48 pm

What I've been told is Volgren using their factory's street number to name there new range when they launch CR221

CR - City/route
SC - School/Charter
C - Coach
221 (221 Hammond Road, Dandenong) - four sqaure head lights
222 (orignally 223, double deck version remains CR223 range) - four big round head lights
224 - Omni City front (no idea why the sole Scania K94UB low floor double deck named CR223LD instead of CR224LD)
225 - Transperth front
226 - Transperth Cat
227 - Dyson's front
228 - four round small head lights
L is low floor or low entry
D is double deck

no idea the SX on the coaches C221 SX stands for

Volgren also have another design for TIBS in Singapore, but none of this has been appeared here.
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Postby Alex on the Bus » Thu Dec 29, 2005 7:56 pm

OLYMPIAN wrote:no idea the SX on the coaches C221 SX stands for.

SX is the two-axle version (single rear axle), while TX is the three-axle version. Why they classed one by the number of rear axles, and the other by the total number of axles, I don't know.
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Postby mjja » Mon Jan 02, 2006 8:26 am

Thanks for the Volgren stuff Olympian, that clears up a lot of unanswered questions for me.

Another question - what do MAN chassis numbers mean? Apparently National have a mix of 12.220s and 15.220s - what's the difference?
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Postby Alex on the Bus » Mon Jan 02, 2006 10:58 am

mjja wrote:Another question - what do MAN chassis numbers mean? Apparently National have a mix of 12.220s and 15.220s - what's the difference?

With these model codes (which are also used for their trucks, I do believe), the first part is the nominal GVM, while the second part is the engine rating in HP. Thus, the 12.220 is a 12 tonne unit with a 220HP engine, while the 15.220 has the same engine but with a GVM of 15 tonnes.

A previous post on this thread covered this, as well as the suffixes which indicate the actual specification of the chassis (low-floor, space-frame, etc.).
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Postby dj_matty » Tue Jan 31, 2006 2:42 pm

What about an Izuzu LT1.11P (if that's right, somehow i think there is more full stops in there....

Does izuzu still produce bus chassis?
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Postby RK215 » Sat Feb 18, 2006 7:06 pm

It seems that however well-designed OEM model designation systems may be, over time they do tend to get “corrupted”, so that, for example, the magnitude of designation changes does not always align with the magnitude of the actual differences.

By way of an example, the evolution of the Leyland model designations post-WWII through to about 1970 certainly had its quirks and inconsistencies. This is so even if one looks just at the core model designations, and (mostly) disregards the suffixes.

Leyland started out simply enough post-WWII with its “P” series, the (vertical front-engined) Tiger PS1 and Titan PS1. In reality, though the Tiger and Titan shared the same basic design, and their under-the-skin differences were probably fewer than for some later models that shared the same name. By the mid-1960’s, some of the Leyland sales literature actually grouped the Tiger and Titan together.

The beefed-up, export models had an “O” prefix, OPS1 and OPD1 – straightforward enough in and of itself. But, whereas the PS1 and OPS1 shared the same 17’6” wheelbase (for 27½ ft nominal overall length, the PD1 and OPD1 differed in this parameter. The PD1 had 16’3” wheelbase for 26 ft nominal overall, whilst the OPD1 was 17’6” for 27½ ft nominal. So, the first “inconsistency” appears.

The second series models, with the O.600 engine, followed the same basic pattern, at least initially. That is, PD2 and OPD2 at respectively 16’3” for 26 ft and 17’6” for 27½ ft, and PS2 and OPS2 sharing 17’6” for 27½ ft.

The OPS3 was a lengthened OPS2, with 20’0” wheelbase for 30 ft nominal overall length. It was followed by the OPS4, with 21’6” wheelbase for 35 ft nominal overall length. So now we have the numeric part of the primary designator indicating differences in wheelbase (and overall length) amongst concurrent models rather than a generational change in mechanical terms. In fact, with digressions, this was to become a standard feature of Leyland model designations for quite a few years.

But before that “rule” became established, and following changes in the British C&U regulations, the PD2 moved up to 16’5” for 27 ft and the PS2 was offered with a long wheelbase option, 18’9” for 30 ft overall (the longer OPS3 wheelbase, for the same length, would probably not have met the British turning circle requirements). These wheelbase and length increases for the PD2 and PS2 did not incur a basic model number change; rather they were handled by appropriate suffix numbers.

The 1950 underfloor-engined Royal Tiger series, at least for the primary export variants, looked logical enough, as:

OPSU1 standard length, 17’6” for 33 ft
OPSU2 long, 20’4” for 36 ft
OPSU3 short, 15’7” for 30 ft

But the secondary, domestic model, 15’7” for 30 ft, was designated as a PSU1, which does not make a lot of sense when looked at against the export series. (The shortish 15’7” wheelbase was originally intended to match 27’6” overall length, but with the change in the British C&U regulations allowing 30 ft overall, Leyland opted to retain the same wheelbase. In contrast, AEC moved its Regal IV from 15’8” (for 27’6”) to 16’4” (for 30 ft.))

Digressing for a moment into the use of suffix numbers in this period, it is curious that Leyland struck a special model designation (PD2/14) for a handful of special, AEC preselector gearbox-equipped PD2 Titans destined for Leeds, but much larger fleets of similarly equipped specials for Australia and New Zealand were not accorded the same courtesy. Sydney received special air-braked, AEC preselector-equipped OPD2/1 and OPS2/1 variants. (A little strange here is that Leyland listed an air-braked, synchromesh gearbox OPD2/2, the OPD2/1 having triple-servo vacuum brakes, so the Sydney models were more in the nature of OPD2/2 specials.) Both Sydney and Auckland received AEC preselector-equipped OPSU1 models. As an aside, whereas the Sydney OPD2 and OPS2 models had AEC-style gearshift lever and shaft installations, with the shaft double-skewed vis-à-vis the steering column, the Auckland (and I assume the Sydney) Royal Tigers had a much neater installation, with the shaft parallel to the steering column.

The lightweight Tiger Cub appeared quite logically as the PSUC1, in one variant, 16’2” wheelbase for 30 ft nominal overall length. As far as I know, the “O” prefix, for “overseas”, was applied only to the left-hand drive models, which were LOPSUC1. The “C” might have had duality of meaning, “Cub” being obvious, but “Comet” being possible in that mechanically, it was a Comet derivative using, initially, a horizontal version of the O.350 engine.

In 1954, the redesigned Royal Tiger Worldmaster superseded the Royal Tiger. (A move that clearly paid out for Leyland; AEC waited until late 1960 to do the same in replacing the Regal IV by the Regal VI, too late to recapture a big share of the heavyweight market.) Here Leyland departed from the “P” series designations and, following the convention established for its heavy trucks and the Comet lightweight trucks and buses, used the “RT” series designations, derived from its name. (But perhaps a little ironic in that the Royal Tiger Worldmaster is usually referred to simply as the Worldmaster, whereas the term “Royal Tiger” is often taken to mean the early model only.)

Export models had an “E” prefix rather than an “O”; the precedent having been established with the Comet models, and also with the Leyland-designed ETB.1 trolleybus chassis.

So the Royal Tiger Worldmaster model line-up was:

ERT1 standard length, 18’0” for 34 ft
ERT2 long, 20’0” for 36 ft
RT3 short, 16’3” for 30 ft

The RT3 lacked the “E” prefix since it was also offered as a domestic model. The numbers followed the same pattern as for the Royal Tiger, except that the domestic model was now properly placed.

The standard and long export variants were also available with lower frames, whence they became CRT1 and CRT2, being “ground Clearance restricted Royal Tiger”.

In 1956 came the long version of the domestic Titan, as the PD3 at 18’6” wheelbase for 30 ft nominal overall, quite logical in context. But if all of the O.600-engined PD/PS models are treated as a homologous series, and listed in size order not chronological order, it can be seen that the summation of individually logical model numbering decisions does not always look quite so consistent.

PD2 Domestic 16’3”/26’0”
PD2 Domestic 16’5”/27’0”
OPD2 Export 17’6”/27’6”
PS2 Domestic 17’6”/27’6”
OPS2 Export 17’6”/27’6”
PD3 Domestic 18’6”/30’0”
PS2 Domestic 18’9”/30’0”
OPS3 Export 20’0”/30’0”
OPS4 Export 21’6”/35’0”

In the late 1950’s, the Atlantean arrived as the PDR1, at 16’3” for 30 ft. The “PDR” naming is logical in the context of the “P” series.

Leyland may have seen the original, 1959 Leopard as a non-mainstream model, judging by its designation as in the “L” series, and not as a member of the “P” series. It started life essentially as a Tiger Cub with an O.600 engine and commensurate driveline, retaining the same (16’2” for 30 ft) dimensions.

1960 saw release of the Royal Tiger Cub RTC1 and Lion PSR1 in quick succession, the former very quietly and the latter with much fanfare. The Royal Tiger Cub was essentially a beefed-up Leopard for the export market, extended to 18’0” wheelbase for 33 ft nominal overall, and with the Pneumocyclic gearbox option. Leyland may have anticipated the modest sales performance that this model realized, hence the use of a non-P-series model number. It may also have been a gap-plugger to match AEC, in that AEC had offered a 17’6”/33 ft export version of the Reliance for a couple of years or so, albeit only with the AH470 engine, the AH590 not being offered until later 1961. On the other hand, those export markets who had previously favoured the standard 33 ft length were starting the move to 36 ft or thereabouts.

The Lion PSR1 was a Worldmaster/Atlantean hybrid, and incidentally was the first Leyland bus model to be offered with the PowerPlus versions of the O.600 and O.680 engines, which otherwise took some time to find their way into the bus models. Its placement in the “P” series, essentially as the single-deck counterpart to the Atlantean, suggested that Leyland had big expectations for the model, although these were hardly realized. It was available in just one set of dimensions, 20’0” wheelbase for 34 ft overall.

In 1960 Leyland also built the first batch of a Worldmaster variant modified by having a front vertically mounted engine, presumably a response to Guy’s earlier introduction of its similarly configured Victory Trambus. But there was no separate model designation; this variant, despite its differences, seems to have been treated as a special. Soon after, Leyland inherited the AEC Kudu (2S series) when it acquired AEC, so it may have been content to have that as its preferred “trambus” style model for the African market. Conversely, the Leyland Tiger OPSU4 was retained rather than the comparable AEC Regal V (S series), although dropping the latter may have been an AEC decision, pre-merger.

In 1961, to address the big change in the British C&U regulations that extended single-decker maximum length 30 to 36 ft, Leyland introduced the Leopard PSU3, with 18’6” wheelbase. This wheelbase was shorter than that for the long Worldmaster, mostly to meet British C&U turning circle requirements. (One can find a precedent, though, in the 36 ft version of the BUT ETB.1 trolleybus, which also had an 18’6” wheelbase.)

Now, this 36 ft Leopard was effectively just an extended version of the Royal Tiger Cub, configured around the new British regulations, although some of the “beefing-up” features of the latter were optional. I suppose that the Leopard name was chosen, though, because by this time, the original Leopard was popular and well-known in the UK, which was seen as the primary market for the long model. So it was easier to present it as a 36 ft Leopard than as a Royal Tiger Cub, which would have been a new name in the UK market.

But the model designation “PSU3”, or at least the numerical part, seems to defy attempts to find a rationale. Clearly, Leyland saw it as a mainstream model, so it was going to be a “PSU”. Fine, but why PSU3? The OPSU3 was the short, export royal Tiger, bearing no close relationship to the Leopard, so there was no connection here. In fact, PSU2 would have been more logical, given that PSU1 had been assigned to the domestic Royal Tiger, and that in some ways the 36 ft Leopard was like a longer version of this, albeit not quite as heavy-duty in some respects. Perhaps the “3” signified 3rd generation underfloor, although if so, it is not easy to construct a good support case. If none of the above applied though, why didn’t Leyland simply use the next “clean” number in the series, PSU4?

The Panther of 1964 was in many ways a rear-engined version of the (long) Leopard, with the same dimensions (18’6” for 36 ft). In that context, its PSUR1 designation was logical. There were some wheelbase variations (17’6”, 18’0” and 20’0” as far as I know) but these seem to have been treated as special build variations, and were not allocated different model numbers.)

The bus and coach versions of the Panther were distinguished by suffix numbers, per normal Leyland practice. That seems unexceptional until it is considered that the bus and coach versions were significantly different, and might have justified greater model number separation, such as PSUR1 for the bus and PSUR2 for the coach, or even different letter combinations to indicate high and low frames. The PSUR1.2 coach was close to being a rear-engined version of the Leopard, having essentially the same axles, steering, brakes and suspension (whether steel or air). On the other hand, the PSUR1.1 bus had some differences, including a significantly different cranked frame. The front end was essentially the same as on Atlantean, with Worldmaster-size brakes. (Presumably the air suspension option was the same, an air-leaf combination, similar to that on the PSR1 Lion, although none of the Panther literature that I have seen is explicit about this.) The rear axle also had Worldmaster-size brakes, although otherwise the rear end was the same as on the coach. The brake sizing on the Panther bus, together with the O.680 engine option (predating the same option on the Leopard), indicated that Leyland was moving its “medium weight” chassis up into “heavy weight” territory. Or, if anyone was expecting a rear-engined Worldmaster, the Panther bus was it.

Similarly unexceptional was the Panther Cub, PSRC1, 16’6” for 33 ft. It had Tiger Cub running units in the short version of the Panther/Swift frame. One supposes that a PSURC1 designation might have been seen as a bit too long, hence the omission of the “U”.

The long version of the Atlantean (18’6” for 33 ft) was naturally enough the PDR2.

In 1966, the 30 ft Leopard was reconfigured as a shortened PSU3, with the same heavy duty options (by then including the O.680 engine), and with the same Pneumocyclic option (never offered on the “L”, and as far as I know, never fitted as a customer special – quite strange, really.) Its PSU4 model number was simply the next in the “PSU” sequence.

Leyland also built Leopards with 17’6” wheelbase, these being treated as special-build PSU3 models. Those for Sydney had more extensive changes, including longer front overhang, following the same principle as the 17’6” option on the Panther. Those for Wellington seem to have been simply a shortened wheelbase version for shortened (34’0”) overall length. Here, the differences between the Leopard and the Royal Tiger Cub would be hard to discern.

What must have been about the last “P” series model number to be assigned was PSU5 covering the further lengthened Leopard, 20’0” wheelbase for 12 metres overall. This was really a heavy weight, though, with Worldmaster-size brakes and a heavy-duty spiral bevel rear axle.

Perhaps the BUT ETB.1 trolleybus chassis should be considered in this series. It appears to have been conceived and designed by Leyland ahead of the formation of the BUT joint venture, and may have lacked a model designation for a while after it was announced and the first orders placed. ETB = Export TrolleyBus is certainly a Leyland-style moniker. But here the wheelbase variations were designated by suffix numbers, not by changing the primary model number. So the original, 17’6” wheelbase for 33 ft overall, was the ETB.1, the short (15’7”/30 ft) version was the ETB.1/1, and the long version (18’6”/36 ft) ETB.1/2. Except for the long version, the wheelbases and lengths aligned with those of the Royal Tiger.

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Postby Asplund » Wed Mar 01, 2006 12:32 am

In Europe Scania has released there new bus and coach range and the new type designation can be read in this press release (Oct 2005).

http://www.scania.com/Images/P05X21EN%2 ... 101904.pdf

Conclusion: They have changed the litre and serie number with a power code...

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Postby The Cap a tan » Fri Apr 21, 2006 10:24 pm

After browsing through the Scania press release as posted by Asplund, I noticed that they made no mention that the engines would be five cylinder instead of the usual six. This being done to help comply with euro 4 regulations. Invicta have ordered 3 chassis to date that should be in build shortly. The new chassis as ordered will be classified as K230 UB4X2EB.
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Postby boronia » Sat Apr 22, 2006 1:15 pm

Windy wrote:VOLVO:


[b]These suffixes signify details as to where the engine is located, and other extra details.


M = Mid mounted underfloor engine (B6M)
R/B = Rear mounted underfloor engine (B10B, B10R)
L = rear underfloor engine vertically mounted, low floor chassis (B7L, B10L)
LE = low entry (up to rear axle, or thereabout) (eg. B10BLE, B6LE, B7RLE)
A = articulated (eg. B10MA, B7LA)
SE = special edition (?) (eg. B10MSE)
TL = double deck, vertically mounted rear engine (B10TL, B7TL)
FA = not sure (eg. B6FA)
FA (UF) = mid mounted engine (eg. B6FA (UF))




I see Volvo are now promoting a B7RSA suffix model chassis

SA= School Automatic
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Postby Windy » Wed May 31, 2006 5:09 pm

I have edited the list which can be found here with the following (like the fleetlists, the edits are in RED):


SCANIA:

Note: MOST Scania chassis have rear mounted engines, there are very few mid mounted underfloor examples)

The prefix applies to how the engine is mounted.


L = Vertically mounted engine, tilted 30 degrees to the left (not sure how it is tilted as such)
K = Vertically mounted engine
N = vertically mounted engine, horizontally opposed (east-west mounted)
F = front engined, vertically mounted.
I'm sure there are others, so please help.

These are the digits which signify the engine capacity (or engine output), and follow immediately after the prefix.

9 = 9 litre engine (from 1st to 4th series)
11 = 11 litre engine (from 1st to 3rd series)
12 = 12 litre engine (from 4th series)
230 = 230PS engine (from 5th series - 9 litre 5 cylinder engine)
270 = 270PS engine (from 5th series - 9 litre 5 cylinder engine)
310 = 310PS engine (from 5th series - 9 litre 5 cylinder engine)
340 = 340PS engine (from 5th series - 12 litre 5 cylinder engine)
380 = 380PS engine (from 5th series - 12 litre 5 cylinder engine)
420 = 420PS engine (from 5th series - 12 litre 5 cylinder engine)

The following digits, which follow the engine capacity indicate the series

1 = 1st series
2 = 2nd series
3 = 3rd series
4 = 4th series

The suffixes inidicate the chassis type, and other extra details.

CRB = standard/city floor height with stepped entry (1st to 3rd series)
CRL = low floor chassis (1st to 3rd series)
ARB = standard floor height articulated chassis (1st to 3rd series)
ARL = low floor articulated chassis (1st to 3rd series)
TRB = extended chassis (1st to 3rd series)

For the above, the second letter indicates where the driving controls are situated.
R = Right hand drive
L = Left hand drive

UB = low floor chassis (4th and 5th series)
UA = low floor articulated (4th and 5th series)
IB = "intercity" height chassis with stepped entry (4th and 5th series)
EB = long distance chassis (4th and 5th series)

The 5th series also include a further designation for the IB series where you have:

Wheel Configuration (source: Scania website)

4x2 = 2 axle vehicle with drive on one axle
6x2 = tri-axle vehicle with drive on one rear axle. One tag axle without drive infront of drive axle.
6x2/2 = tri-axle vehicle with drive on one rear axle. One tag axle without drive in front of the drive axle. Used to designate articulated buses.
6x2*4 = tri-axle vehicle with drive on one rear axle. One steered tag axle without drive behind drive axle

Chassis height

These suffixes denotes what kind of floor height is "married" to the chassis, which is denoted by the prefix. It only applies to the 5th series of Scania chassis. A further designation applies to the 5th series

E = Extra Low
L = Low (low front and normal rear)
M = Low (low front and middle, normal rear), articulated
N = Normal (normal front and rear)

Ok, now the examples.

K94IB = vertically mounted, 9 litre motor, 4th series chassis, intercity floor chassis
N113ARB = horizontally opposed vertically mounted 11 litre motor, articulated standard/city floor chassis
L113TRB = vertically mounted 11 litre motor tilted 30 degrees to the left on an extended chassis
K380IB4x2NB = Vertical 380PS engine with a multipurpose chassis for long and short distances and with normal drive and ride comfort without the special adaptation. It is a 2 axle chassis with a normal floor level throughout the chassis and full air suspension.
K420EB6x2*4LI = Vertical 420PS engine with a chassis for long distance travel and high drive and ride comfort. Chassis has no special adaptation, and has 3 axles, with a steered tag axle behind the drive axle. The coach may aslo be built with a low boarding step and a low floor from the front up to the rear axle. This type of coach is also built with a normal floor level throughout (denoted by the "N", and the chassis is fully air-suspended with independant front suspension.
N310UA6x2/2EB = Transverse engine with 310PS, articulated citybus chassis. Has 3 axles, with a non-steered axle infront of the drive axle. Low floor throughout the length of the bus (denoted by the "E") and the chassis is fully air-suspended.


VOLVO:

The following are model types, which were desginated by numbers.


B55 Ailsa = Front engined double deck chassis
B56 = Mid-mounted underfloor engine, predecessor to the B58.
B57 = Front engined
B58 = Mid-mounted underfloor engine
B59 = Rear mounted underfloor engine

These numbers have a "B" prefix, it is "bakbus", which is Swedish for "Bus".

10 = "10 litre" motor (effectively 9.6L)
12 = 12 litre motor
7 = 7 litre motor
6 = 6 litre motor

These suffixes signify details as to where the engine is located, and other extra details.

M = Mid mounted underfloor engine (B6M)
R/B = Rear mounted underfloor engine (B10B, B10R)
L = rear underfloor engine vertically mounted, low floor chassis (B7L, B10L)
LE = low entry (up to rear axle, or thereabout) (eg. B10BLE, B6LE, B7RLE)
A = articulated (eg. B10MA, B7LA)
SE = special edition (?) (eg. B10MSE)
TL = double deck, vertically mounted rear engine (B10TL, B7TL)
FA = front engined (eg. B6FA)
FA (UF) = mid mounted engine (eg. B6FA (UF))
SA = School Automatic (eg. the new B7RSA)

LEYLAND/ALBION:

Leyland used abbrieviations for their chassis designations over time, and these are the following:


O = overseas (export version for 8 ft wide body)
P = passenger
S = single deck
D = double deck
U = underfloor
R = rear engine, blank for front engine
E = export
RT = Royal Tiger

The first Royal Tigers in Sydney were OPSU1,
but the second batch were coded ERT

The Tiger Cub was coded PSUC
C: Cub
then later RTC

VK = Viking
TRC = Tiger
ON = Olympian
AN = Atlantean

There was a mix of numbers after the abbreviations, some denoted suspension or other mechanical differences, others included the motor used.

For example:

AN68 = Atlantean with a 0.680 engine
VK41 = Front engined Viking
VK45 = Rear engined Viking
ONTL11/2RH = Olympian with a TL11 motor and hydracyclic semi-automatic gearbox
ONCL10/2RZ4 = Olympian with a Cummins L10 and a 4 speed ZF 4HP 500 gearbox.
TRL11/2RZ6 = Tiger with a Leyland L11 engine and a 6 speed ZF manual gearbox.

TRCLXB/2R = Tiger with a Gardner 6LXB motor
OPD2 = Overseas Passenger Double-deck
PSUR = Passenger Single-deck Underfloor Rear engined (ie. A Leyland Panther)

Anyway, I should be getting back to work!!!!! :roll:
Windy
 

Postby mjja » Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:35 am

Does that mean Scania's 5 series are out? Or just planned?
Happy Gunzelling and remember, "Go By Rail!"

Michael Angelico
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Postby Windy » Tue Jun 06, 2006 6:00 pm

mjja wrote:Does that mean Scania's 5 series are out? Or just planned?


Their series is in production, a demonstrator K230UB demo is with Busways for the moment.
Windy
 

Scania again

Postby Asplund » Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:59 pm

I saw that Scania released K470 today (20/6), see http://www.scania.com/pressroom/index.asp

:D

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Postby Windy » Fri Aug 25, 2006 2:48 pm

An update on the MAN list, as a result of some info whcih came to me from an enthusiast friend in Singapore who recently went to Switzerland...

As usual, the updated info is in red.

M.A.N:

The following are the prefixes used for the Cityline buses.


Under structure (Monocoque floor):

NL = Niederflur bau-weise linenbusse ("Low floor city bus")
SG = Stadtlinen Gelenkenbusse (City Line Articulated Bus)
NG = Niederflur Gelenkenbusse (Low-floor Articulated Bus)
NM = Niederflur Midibusse (Low-floor Midibus - Europe only)
SGG = Stadtlinen Doppelgelenkenbusse (Double-articulated Bus - Europe only)
NGG = Niederflur Doppelgelenkenbusse (Low-floor Double-articulated Bus - Europe only)
NL = stands for Nieder flur bau-weise Linienbusse (Low floor city bus)NU - stands for Nieder flur bau-weise Überlandbusse (Low floorintercity bus)

Chassis:

SL = Sonderaufbauten Linienbusse (Super structure city bus)
SG = Sonderaufbauten gelenkenbusse (Super structure articulated city bus)
SÜ = Sonderaufbauten Überlandbusse (Super structure touringcoach)


The three digit numbers in the SL/NL series are as follows:

12- = Nominal engine power in horsepower, divided by 10 (e.g. NL232 is supposed to have a 230hp motor)
--3 = Series number.

Mind you, the above is all up the spout: series numbers were only formally introduced for Series 3 (late 1990s), while power ratings were (until Series 3) only nominal, with some models having more than one power option

For the "numbers only" (for want of a better description), they are as follows:

Before the decimal point = the gross vehicle mass in tonnes
After the decimal point = ideally, the output of the motor in bhp.

UOCL = (Germanic equivalent unknown) Underfloor chassis
HOCL = Hochboden Linienbus (high-floor rear engined buses)
HOCLN = Hochboden Linienbus - Nachlaufachse (high-floor /dd coach tri axle)
HGOCL = Hochboden Gelenkbusse (high-floor articulate)

FOCL = (Germanic equivalent unknown) front engined chassis
Windy
 

Postby tbc1983_ » Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:10 pm

Just a slight correction to the above.
Where -busse is mentioned, it should be -bus as -busse is plural.

AND: ,,Stadtlinen" should be ,,Stadtlinien", which literally means "City Lines", if I'm correct.

And some other literal translations:

Ueberlandbus* = Over land bus
Sonder = Special.
Bauweise = Build method/knowledge
Aufbauten = Constructed ???

And with FOCL, I'm purely guessing, but it could be ,,Front eingestellten Motor Linienbus" ????

Cheers!

*I couldn't be bothered using Character Map for the U-Umlaut, so I put a lower-case "e".
ATDB member's quotes are now on holiday.

Looks like Herbert's H.D. will have to do 'a phoenix'!
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Postby Windy » Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:16 am

tbc1983 wrote:Just a slight correction to the above.
Where -busse is mentioned, it should be -bus as -busse is plural.

AND: ,,Stadtlinen" should be ,,Stadtlinien", which literally means "City Lines", if I'm correct.

And some other literal translations:

Ueberlandbus* = Over land bus
Sonder = Special.
Bauweise = Build method/knowledge
Aufbauten = Constructed ???

And with FOCL, I'm purely guessing, but it could be ,,Front eingestellten Motor Linienbus" ????

Cheers!

*I couldn't be bothered using Character Map for the U-Umlaut, so I put a lower-case "e".


Jawohl... mein deutsche ist nicht gut. It had been pointed out previously, but I couldn't be arsed changing it, really :)
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